Industrial

A Wisconsin-based design/build  contractor with 56 years of experience building manufacturing facilities is taking the next big step in its evolution.

MSI General Corp.’s Eco/Design Build program, launched in 2009, offers industrial-sector and other clients high-performance building options regardless of whether they wish to seek formal LEED certification through the U.S. Green Building Council.

“We concentrate on the return on investment, not the certification,” says Craig Coursin, AIA, president of the Oconomowoc, Wis.-based company. “Most of our buildings exceed LEED energy requirements. However, many clients do not have a reason to be certified. They just want to have lower operating costs and provide a great work environment.”

After 61 years, Monroe Tractor has become a full-service dealer for any make or model of construction and agriculture equipment, President Janet Felosky says. “We can repair and service all makes of equipment,” she says. “We were in the rental business ... long before other people were.”

The Henrietta, N.Y.-based firm sells and rents equipment from multiple manufacturers, including Case Construction Equipment, Wirtgen Group and Doosan. Felosky’s father, Henry Hansen, started the company in 1951 as a Case distributor.

When it comes to tension fabric buildings, one size may not fit all, but one company can do it all. ClearSpan Fabric Structures has engineered, manufactured and installed tension fabric structures for the past 33 years for an array of industries with a variety of needs.

The flexible yet durable structures can be fashioned into storage facilities, processing facilities, entertainment venues, animal shelters and more. There are benefits that all of ClearSpan’s clients enjoy, such as an abundance of natural daylight, which reduces energy costs. However, President Barry Goldsher explains that when customers come to ClearSpan, they are looking for a solution that fits their exact need.

There are many different effects a construction project can have, but one that should never go overlooked is the benefit it brings to a community. Del’s Construction Co. Inc. is building one that will bring many to its hometown of Le Sueur, Minn.

Currently, the company is working as the general contractor on a plant expansion for Cambria, a family owned manufacturer of natural quartz surfaces. When finished, Cambria says, the expansion will more than double the size and production capacity of its plant, giving it the ability to accommodate worldwide demand.

Although the lingering effects of the recession continue to be felt throughout the country, there are signs that things are beginning to turn around. One such sign is the work being done at Daikin America’s manufacturing plant in Decatur, Ala.

Originally put on hold because of the struggling economy a few years ago, today work on a significant expansion of the facility is underway and is expected to bring approximately 50 new jobs to the region. The plant, which produces chemical products utilized in the manufacturing of other products, is being expanded to meet a growing need in manufacturing, according to Vice President and Plant Manager David Hendrixson.

The theory of fixing building blemishes by slapping a coat of paint on the wall doesn’t always work. It might work for a nick on a bedroom wall, but for other buildings, such as the industrial facilities that Coatings Unlimited Inc. (CUI) works on, the process is far more complex.

Manufacturing facilities, mining equipment, pharmaceutical plants, aerospace facilities, oil and gas plants, water and wastewater infrastructure and power plants are routinely exposed to heavy use, abrasive and corrosive materials and fluctuating temperatures and often times, all at once. Without the proper protection, the environment pronounces doom. However, the right materials applied by skilled craftsmen can save these expensive investments.

Brencal Contractors Inc. says its leadership prides itself on taking a hands-on approach to each of the projects it completes for clients.“Our owners, Charles J. and Brian W. Brickel, are basically the project managers of their own company,” says Vice President Ken Perko, who also serves as the Warren, Mich.-based general contractor's chief estimator. “I turn projects over to them, and in many cases they will take the projects on themselves. Both of them are only a phone call away, so our clients don't have to go up the chain of command; they can speak directly with our owners.”

Numerous steel contractors saw their business dwindle when the economy took a turn for the worse in 2008, and there was little chance for a fast recovery because of the specialized nature of this industry. But that wasn’t the case for Tampa Tank Inc. and Florida Structural Steel (TTI/FSS), which diversified its capabilities and its geographic reach long before the recession took a grip on the construction industry.

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