Industrial

Sometimes reliability can be in short supply in a boom town, and in the rapidly growing Bakken Shale area of North Dakota around Williston, a company that is able to deliver what it promises is a valued commodity. Legacy Steel Buildings has been delivering quality and reliability in the Bakken Shale region with hundreds of buildings, says Bruce Engkjer, vice president and co-owner.

To service its many customers in the Bakken Shale, Legacy Steel Buildings has established offices in Dunn Center, Ray and Belfield, N.D. “We just finished a building 300 feet wide for CSI, a division of Dupree Energy, just outside of Williston and are now starting a 60,000-square-foot building for Coca-Cola in Williston,” Engkjer announces. “I think the biggest advantage is our quality.”

The completion of a taxiway connecting the International Technology & Aerospace Park (ITAP) to the Myrtle Beach International Airport runway is just the first step toward sparking the creation of a new aviation hub in South Carolina, local officials say.

“This is a win-win for everybody,” says Pat Apone, director of airports for Horry County. “We are diversifying jobs for the community as the airport continues to grow. This continues to be an excellent community-development building project.“ 

Construction work includes demolition and site grading, maintenance of traffic, drainage and erosion control installation, subgrade stabilization and aggregate and stabilized base placement. In addition, the work entails asphalt and portland cement concrete paving, pavement marking and airfield lighting and signage installation for the taxiway and ramp. Greenwall Construction Co. of Myrtle Beach was chosen as the contractor in November with an initial March completion scheduled.

The project is designed to enhance the aerospace park by making it more attractive to potential tenants because it will allow direct access to the runway. Several companies have expressed initial interest, Apone says. The park could eventually employ more than 2,500 aviation workers, officials say. The taxiway project is funded by Federal Aviation Administration grants, federal utility grants and the airport.

Whether it’s for lofty dreams of saving the world or simply a way to save money over the long term, embracing environmentally friendly buildings is very much the norm today, especially in the United states with states such as New York and California leading the way. 

In fact, the USGBC recently reported that the growing green building industry in the United States will account for more than half of all commercial and industrial  construction by 2016. The green building trend accounted for an estimated 44 percent of all commercial and institutional construction in the United States in 2012 and USGBC forecasts that number will grow to 55 percent by 2016. 

As the United States and the world in general grows evermore green-conscious, building owners will often go to great lengths to meet third-party sustainable building requirements such as LEED or take measures simply to satisfy their own green-guilt standard. 

From expensive and complicated geothermal heating systems to quirky architectural elements made from recycled glass, building owners have voted with their dollars that green is the way to go. But depending on the building type and use, going green isn’t always that complicated. Some structures are just built that way. 

When Green Bay Packaging Inc. – a Green Bay, Wis.- based manufacturer of high-quality products used for retail packaging and labeling applications – chose C.D. Smith to lay the foundation for its new 330,000-square-foot addition in summer 2013 – it knew it was getting the experts of concrete and steel.

The 78-year-old Fond du Lac, Wis.- based company is a general contractor that specializes in corporate structures, sustainable manufacturing plants, state-of-the-art healthcare facilities and educational buildings. 

“We are not just geared toward one or two markets,” Project Manager Jasen Anhalt says. “Our claim to fame was historically water treatment work, which we still do, but we have broadened our services.”

Today, C.D. Smith performs its services in the religious, municipal, education, healthcare, hospitality and commercial markets. Its annual revenue exceeds $300 million and C.D. Smith has become a well-known contractor in the Midwest by completing projects throughout Wisconsin and in nearly 20 states across the country. “We are a pretty well-rounded contractor, but our main bread and butter is in concrete and steel,” Anhalt adds. The company believes in delivering quality in every aspect of its operations and that dedication is exhibited in every one of its more than 400 employees. 

The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis reports that the towns of Midland and Odessa, Texas, ranked first and second respectively in economic growth in the United States for 2012. Midland showed a GDP growth of 14.4 percent while Odessa followed closely behind with a 14.1 percent gain. The growth is the result of the robust oil and gas production happening in the Permian Basin. 

The energy production itself has fueled the growth, but so have a number of ancillary and support services necessary to keep the production going and meet the needs of the cities’ growing populations. Companies are there, for example, to provide more housing, infrastructure, retail and various commercial developments for the area.

“There’s certainly a lot of economic activity in the Permian Basin with all of the drilling activity and oilfield services business that accompany,” says Rob Huthnance, managing director of development and construction firm Avera. “All of those involved in that activity need a home and a place to house business.”  

Enstrom Helicopter Corp.‘s choice of general contractor to design and build an expansion to its manufacturing plant in Menominee, Mich., became clear after the company looked into the backgrounds of the frontrunners for the job. “The feedback Enstrom received during the prequalification process from our previous clients is what swayed them to hire us and weighed heavily in their decision,” says Tom Helminen, president of Moyle Construction USA, the contractor chosen in 2013 to lead the project. 

Much of the positive feedback Enstrom received about Houghton, Mich.-based Moyle Construction’s work noted the skills and abilities of its project staff. “We’re a construction company, but we’re not just about computers, heavy equipment and steel – we’re about people,” Helminen says. “Our people are what make a project happen, and from top to bottom, we have a very good staff in all departments of our company.” 

 As if providing project management services for manufacturing companies across a diverse range of industries weren’t enough, InSpec Group offers its clients an entire parcel of facility conception services.

CEO Taro Toyoda emphasizes that InSpec Group’s uniqueness lies in the firm’s ability to offer a “a full breadth of disciplines,” including project planning, site selection, and facility design and engineering services, in addition to construction which includes architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical, instrumentation and control, and procurement. 

 Allstate Tower (AST) Inc. recently celebrated its 10th anniversary in November 2013, but the company still considers itself one of “the little fish in a big sea,” according to Director Ben Johnston. 

He explains, “AST sees this position as exciting, because the full-service contractor has a lot of room to grow. We are confident our Maintenance, Turnkey and Fabricated Steel Divisions, combined with our solid vision and focus on quality, will pave the way forward.

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