Commercial

Tutor Perini pixTutor Perini is building a dual brand hotel for downtown Fort Lauderdale.

By Tim O’Connor

With winds approaching 100 mph, Hurricane Irma was a destructive force in south Florida – and a source of fear for the project teams whose building sites were potentially exposed to the storm’s full wrath.

At 299 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., just north of Miami, crews began preparing the new Dalmar/Element Hotel for the hurricane on Sept. 5, five days before it made landfall. By Sept. 8, the contractor, Tutor Perini, determined it had done everything it could and sent its field crews home to prepare their own families for the storm. When workers finally returned on Sept. 18, they found that their preparations had been rewarded.

Craft ConstructionCraft Construction’s extensive local experience has made it a go-to hotel builder.

By Tim O’Connor

Barry Craft and Stephen Harden are used to working with their hands. The two began their careers in the construction industry as carpenters, and as the principals of Florida’s Craft Construction they still want to touch every part of a project, from laying the foundations to completing the finishes.

Downing ConstructionDowning Construction thrives in Iowa’s booming commercial market.

By Chris Kelsch

One might not necessarily think of Iowa as a hotbed for commercial construction, but nevertheless it has quietly taken off in recent years. “We are very excited about the Iowa market,” Downing Construction Partner Justin Brown says. “Because of its gusting winds, Iowa has a lot of low-cost energy, and that has led to companies like Apple, Microsoft and Facebook building large data centers here.” Indeed, all three companies will soon have large data centers in the state, all within 25 miles of each other.

Downing Construction has been an active participant in an exploding commercial market in recent years, but the company didn’t start out in that sector. It actually began in 1966, when founder Robert Downing began building homes in the Indianola, Iowa, community with one employee, two trucks and one 8-by-20-foot trailer.

JRMPhoto Credit: Studios Architecture

Celebrating its 10-year anniversary, JRM Construction Management has carved a niche for itself with a client-first mentality. 
By Bianca Herron

David G. McWilliams, Joseph Romano and James Connolly launched JRM Construction Management in 2007 as a general contracting firm specializing in commercial interiors in various industries, including high-end corporate, retail and private schools.

Prior to starting the company the trio had worked together in some capacity over the past 20 years, Partner and President Romano says. Ten years later, the New York-based company has had significant growth, and now has 300 employees and additional offices in California and New Jersey.

With its annual average volume of $500 million, JRM’s clients are comprised of Fortune 500 companies, retailers, financial investment and law firms, and prestigious schools. The company strives to consistently provide high-quality work.

One of the keys to JRM’s success has been the involvement of ownership and senior level management, according to Romano. “No one sits at a desk and does nothing,” he says. “We all roll up our sleeves and are available 24/7.”

Colonial WebbColonialWebb uses prefabrication to increase efficiency as a subcontractor for the second-tallest building in Richmond, Va.

By Janice Hoppe-Spiers

From initial design to completion, ColonialWebb offers a turnkey construction experience for its clients. The company prides itself on having the expertise to take on any new construction challenge, including 600 Canal Place, which will be Richmond, Va.’s second-tallest building.

Celebrating its 45th anniversary this year, the Richmond, Va.-based company began in 1972 as Colonial Mechanical and specialized in HVAC. First Energy acquired the company in 1998 along with Webb Technologies, which eventually resulted in the formation of ColonialWebb. In 2010, ComfortSystems USA Inc., a Houston-based provider of commercial, industrial and institutional HVAC services, acquired ColonialWebb.

Today, ColonialWebb serves mechanical contracting, HVAC and industrial refrigeration customers in Virginia, Maryland North Carolina and South Carolina. With eight operations locations and more than 750 employees, the company and history continues to grow and embrace a changing industry.

JohnMoriarty6

Photo courtesy of MarkFlannery.com

John Moriarty and Associates lands the development deal of a lifetime that will include the Boston Celtics as tenants.

By Kat Zeman

Boston has a new neighborhood on the horizon. Poised on the Mass Pike and easily accessible from anywhere in the city, the mixed-use 15-acre development will soon be the new home of an apartment complex and a variety of commercial businesses, sports venues and a hotel.

Welcome to Boston Landing. It’s already the new home of the Boston Bruins hockey team and the Boston Celtics basketball team’s practice facility will follow soon. The mammoth development, which has been baptized as the revitalization of Boston’s Brighton neighborhood, is the brainchild of New Balance Chairman Jim Davis.

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