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By Alison Stanton

As you're already likely aware, driving your vehicle to and from as well as within construction sites is not the same as commuting to the office. Of course, these locations can be inherently dangerous, requiring you to maneuver around heavy equipment, through muddy conditions and to avoid fellow employees.

In addition, some of the sites may be quite a distance from your office, which means you'll be putting a number of miles on your vehicle. Ensuring your vehicle is job-site-ready requires some preparation, so here are three tips to get you started.

shutterstock 485734309By Jayme Cook

Construction workers constitute between 5 and 10 percent of the workforce in first-world countries and, in the U.S. in particular, it is an industry that requires few qualifications yet offers relatively good pay, possibly even financial security. Construction work, however, is also one of the most physically demanding and potentially dangerous jobs an individual can work. For construction managers, professionals and executives, the safety of their crews is usually a top priority and never far from the front of their minds. To ensure that safety, employers of construction employees that work in dangerous environments should use this checklist of safety equipment items and consider these tips regarding industry concerns and construction safety.

shutterstock 383356447By Susan Finch

The amount of time spent on construction meetings may be a necessary part of the job to cover everything from project status to safety but doesn't have to consume precious time. Jim Hees argues it's entirely possible for construction meetings to be short, to the point, and effective by staying focused and on task. But how and where you run your meetings also matters.

It’s inevitable to need some on-site meetings with your crew, but that doesn’t mean you can’t rely on telepresence to create a virtual meeting room to reduce travel time and work around busy schedules quickly. It’s also a smart way to monitor your construction site in real time without the need to be there physically. Here’s how to transform your construction business through telepresence.

ThinkstockPhotos 491218972By Brian Binke

The United States is in need of a labor workforce that will bring back a strong middle-class. Collaborations between government and business can help create these opportunities. Hundreds of thousands of these skilled-trade jobs are already in demand and are going unfilled. These $20 to $45 an hour jobs are left unfilled because we don’t have the skilled workers prepared for the positions. Filling these positions will benefit millions of Americans in low-paying jobs and lift many out of poverty. Here are some ways that we can build a strong skilled labor force.  

ThinkstockPhotos 669200520By Brian Binke             

The construction industry continues to experience a labor shortage within all areas of the market; yet companies are optimistic about that changing in the future because of actions that they’re taking now. What are they doing to improve the pipeline of skilled construction workers entering the market? And what more can be done to improve the pipeline going forward?

 

construction equip featured imageBy Jemima Meyers

Construction and other heavy equipment is a vital asset to many businesses. Since it's a substantial financial investment, it is only fair to keep up with its maintenance at all times. Unfortunately, some silly habits can damage your construction equipment and adversely affect your ROI. There are some great tips to help you change those habits and ensure your construction equipment remains functional for a long time to come.

ThinkstockPhotos 623689570By Dwayne Kula

In the construction industry, there are many electrical contractors whose job is to help choose, install and order the electrical components for a project. A majority of this work revolves around lighting fixtures, and an electrical contractor that knows about different lighting technologies and safety requirements will be able to help aid in the construction process for an energy efficient and safe building.

imageBy Roy Rasmussen

Inventory management issues can have a bigger effect on your business than you might think. The average business spends 25 to 35 percent of their annual operational costs on inventory, which reflects overspending by 35 percent due to poor inventory management practices, according to Scanco. Poor inventory management raises operational costs, reduces profits and makes companies more likely to encounter cash-flow problems. Inventory problems hurt the economy, too. For instance, accumulation of inventory dragged the U.S. economy down by nearly 1 percent in the first quarter of 2017, Bureau of Economic Analysis data shows. Products that sit on shelves don’t generate profit.

On the other hand, improving inventory management can be a cost-efficient way to cut your operational costs and boost your profit margin. Here are three best practices to help you track your inventory more efficiently while wasting less on inventory problems.

ThinkstockPhotos 584498620By Joshua Estrin, Ph.D

Research is often a long-term commitment that takes years before becoming available to the industry for review and discussion. While there are numerous factors that make this a reality, one of the most challenging is a willingness by key industry stakeholders to work collaboratively with researchers on seminal studies, in this case construction safety.  Safety in our industry is a hot topic, but when asked to make a commitment to research that will save lives, many of our largest organizations refuse to work towards the common goal of decreasing the number of construction fatalities.

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