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By Sara Parker

Last year, 1 in 5 worker deaths occurred within the construction industry, according to OSHA. In addition to that startling statistic, some of the top-10 OSHA standards violations were related to issues concerning equipment, personal protection equipment, machinery and electrical systems. 

While most everyday job sites are safe places to work, construction professionals must take the necessary precautions to avoid on-the-job employee accidents. Business owners must work to ensure optimal workplace safety by determining whether all equipment is functioning and meets OSHA standards. Here are four areas in which construction companies should keep a watchful eye.

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applying membraneHome Builders need to  consider preventive waterproofing as part of new construction.

By Matt Stock

When assessing the value of waterproofing for new construction, some contractors see lots of costs, but no real benefits. However, investing in this type of preventive maintenance adds value to the potential home buyer and bolsters the reputation of the builder who demonstrates this level of concern for his customers.

Depositphotos 11634299 s 2015By Naomi Bagga

If done right, a YouTube channel can be a valuable asset to any marketing campaign. As the second largest search engine and third most visited site after Google and Facebook, it's no wonder companies are creating their own channels on the video platform. However, as with any marketing strategy, it's important that it is executed correctly to ensure maximum benefit. Check out these quick tips to get your company's channel up to scratch:

ThinkstockPhotos 499148012By Michael Sutherland

The facility and asset management industry of today is constantly embracing new challenges to thrive in an ever-changing environment. New technologies, evolving client expectations and an expanding emphasis on customer experience all combine to make the industry more complex than ever before.

These are among the many factors pushing this industry to shape itself in a new way. To properly respond to these challenges, the first place to look is at the people. Keeping up with the facility management industry of the future means enabling the new facility manager, a role that incorporates the unique, requisite skills to respond to the challenges that the industry currently presents.

ConstructionToday imageBy Jeremy Cook 

Potential theft of property is something we are all concerned about at some point or other. But in the construction industry, the very nature of what we’re doing is unfinished and therefore not necessarily covered by planned security systems, making sites especially vulnerable. Even something as simple as locking the doors might not yet be possible. Unless you’ll have workers (or a guard) on the site 24/7, you won’t always be able to keep an eye on your power tools and other expensive equipment, leaving sites and property at risk for theft. Since you need your tools to complete the job, theft can really be a hit to productivity and throw you off schedule. Fortunately, there are some electronic devices available to help keep everything secure.

imageBy Roy Rasmussen

The connected home market is estimated to expand at a compound annual growth rate of 14.07 percent to reach$121.73 billion by 2022. By 2020,50 percent of North American householdswith broadband access are expected to be connected. As connectivity becomes standard, construction teams are enjoying the benefits of being connected as well. Being connected on-site improves communications, efficiency and safety. But there are many connectivity options and choosing one can be challenging. Here’s a look at today’s construction connectivity options to help you choose the right solution for your project.

ThinkstockPhotos 513880387By Michael Bardwil, M.D.

Varicose veins probably aren’t among the top medical concerns for most construction workers. But years of long hours standing on job sites can lead to the swollen, twisted and enlarged veins – particularly for people who have a genetic predisposition for the condition.

Experts regularly count construction workers among those most likely to develop varicose veins – right up there with postal workers, hair dressers, cashiers, nurses and miners. They all have jobs that involve standing all, or most of, the day, making it harder for veins to pump blood from workers’ feet back up to their hearts.

It’s a condition more common in women than in men – and often associated with post-pregnancy medical issues. But in the last 30 years, I’ve treated hundreds of workers – often men in construction – and others who perform difficult tasks such as heavy lifting and standing for long periods of time who have struggled with varicose veins. Today, such patients are more fortunate than their predecessors, as modern medicine is providing more effective and less invasive relief.

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By Susan Finch

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, 4,836 workers were killed on the job in 2015. Among those, 17 percent included fatal injuries involving contractors. Further, the census found that among the 937 fatal work industries in private construction in 2015 represented the highest total since 2008.

Reducing workplace injuries and fatalities starts with proactive prevention and a culture of safety. It’s not enough to simply advise workers on safety expectations and policies and then hope for the best. It takes careful planning and systematic training to reduce workplace injuries and prevent them from rising. Get started by looking for dangerous habits in the workplace. Here’s what to look for.

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Helical Pile 60By Gary L. Seider 

Pipe shaft helical piles have the ability to provide a superior foundation solution during disaster recovery and resistance when compared to other deep foundation options. Preliminary results show that helical piles offer improved seismic resistance due to their slenderness, higher dampening ratios, ductility and resistance to uplift.

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